Tiny Luxuries

Contains the novella

One of the preconceived notions I was disavowed of when researching tiny houses for my novella “Big Love” (which is part of the Coming Home: A Tiny House Collection, published by Penwrights Press), is that these small living spaces are Spartan, utilitarian, and basically cute. But certainly not attractive or luxurious.

Well, I discovered I was wrong. And, as my protagonist Berly Charles says in the novella, “If you think so, you’re wrong too.” (She has opinions.)

Tiny houses are, by nature, utilitarian. That’s part of their whole minimalist attraction. But like a Frank Lloyd Wright Usonian style home (also part of my novella), that doesn’t mean unattractive.

LuxuryTinyHouseToday in my email I received another reminder of how jaw-droppingly beautiful these homes can be, if that’s what you’re looking for. If you click on the photo above you’ll be taken to a Tiny House Talk article about that house. Treat yourself and watch the video. It’s five minutes you won’t feel is wasted. Oh, and the inside is where most of the gorgeousity happens.

Then treat yourself further and check out the reviews for Coming Home (and “Big Love”) at Amazon. Give the book a try. I think you’ll like it. And with seven novellas in one book, it’s a luxury you can afford.


“Big Love” is one of seven novellas written around the theme of tiny houses. It is included in Coming Home: A Tiny House Collection from Penwrights Press. Available in e-book and print . Cover design by Ken Raney.

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Visit my co-authors: Ane Mulligan, Linda Yezak, Pamela S. Meyers, Yvonne Anderson, Chandra Lynn Smith, and Kimberli S. McKay.

Tiny House Living May Not Be For You—But Our Book Is!

My novella, “Big Love,” is just one of seven great reads collected here!

Me and my co-authors in the novella collection Coming Home (which contains my novella, “Big Love” and six others) were attracted to the concept of tiny house living for many reasons:

We’re fascinated by them! Tiny houses are part of a current societal trend we found interesting—minimalizing the impact we have on the planet.

They fired our creative synapses! There were a plethora of opportunities to creatively integrate tiny houses into our stories.

We’re romantics at heart. They are, gosh darn it, sort of romantic and intriguing and fun—especially as settings.

Some of us, myself included, have contemplated living in a tiny house but none of us currently do. For me and my lifestyle, I see them as a fun second home to have on lakefront property. A place to get away to.

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My wife waiting in line to see this tiny home. We could live in this on lakefront property some day.

Fortunately, readers don’t have to live in a tiny house to enjoy our stories. You just have to like great stories about fun people who live in tiny houses or, in some cases, work in the industry. But what if you’re seriously considering taking the plunge to tiny- or small-house living?

That’s great! You’ll enjoy the stories then, for sure. If you haven’t plunged yet, but are thinking about it, here are 10 things to consider—especially if you have children at home—that may take the romantic stars out of your eyes. Or not, if you are really committed to small house living.

Diane and Chris, who author the Small Home Family blog linked to above, have two children and live in a 400-square-foot tiny house.

What are your thoughts on tiny house living? Do you say “yes” or “no” or, like me, “maybe” in the right circumstances?


Buy on Amazon.

“Big Love” is one of seven novellas written around the theme of tiny houses. It is included in Coming Home: A Tiny House Collection from Penwrights Press. Available in e-book and print . Cover design by Ken Raney.

Screen Shot 2017-02-08 at 11_Fotor

Visit my co-authors: Ane Mulligan, Linda Yezak, Pamela S. Meyers, Yvonne Anderson, Chandra Lynn Smith, and Kimberli S. McKay.

A Fabulous Fall Read

Fall Read Meme

Shared post: Write or type?

The other day I found this interesting blog by Chris Hilton (follow the link at the end to read it) about whether those who use a computer or those who write longhand are more creative.

I found many of the arguments persuasive, but for me it boils down to the physical. My hands, arms, and shoulders are so abused after a lifetime of making my living with a computer keyboard that writing with a pencil (or a pen) would cause me some fairly significant pain.

And I’m not sure my handwriting would be fast enough for the little man who drives my creativity.

Plus, I’m not even sure I could read my own writing anymore and I’m absolutely positive that no one else could.

But enough about me. What do you think? Do you write longhand? Or do you use a computer? Are there times when you might do both? Would you ever try longhand?

Read Hilton’s post: Write or type?

Mike-9Michael Ehret loves to play with words and as the editor of CHEFS Mix Blog for CHEFS Catalog he is enjoying his playground. Previous playgrounds include being the Managing Editor of the magazine ACFW Journal and the ezine Afictionado for seven years. He also plays with words as a freelance editor and has edited several nonfiction books, proofedited for Abingdon Press, worked in corporate communications, and reported for The Indianapolis Star.

Pencil image courtesy of ponsulak / FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

Quote It! Ray Bradbury

Ray_Bradbury“You don’t have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them.”

— Ray Bradbury, recipient of the 2000 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, the 2004 National Medal of Arts, and the 2007 Pulitzer Prize Special Citation. Renowned author of Fahrenheit 451, The Martian Chronicles, and Something Wicked This Way Comes. (1920-2012)

I don’t think it’s possible to underestimate the importance of reading–not only for personal growth, but for the benefit of our society-at-large. Saw some disturbing reading statistics from 2012 today:

  • 56%: Young people who claim they read more than 10 books a year. (That’s not even one a month.)
  • 33%: U.S. high school graduates who will never read a book after high school. (Never. As in no more books their entire life.)
  • 42%: College students who will never read another book after they graduate. (It’s getting worse.)
  • 80%: U.S. families that did not buy a book this year. (Can it get worse?)

If you are a reader, good for you! According to the same study, if you read only 15 minutes a day you expose yourself to 1 million words annually. All of those words help keep your brain nimble–and a nimble brain is a good thing!

What are your thoughts on reading and our culture?

Michael Ehret, for Writing on the Fine Line

Michael Ehret loves to play with words and as editor of the ACFW Journal, he is enjoying his playground. He also plays with words as a freelance editor here at WritingOnTheFineLine.com, where he often takes a writer Into The Edit, pulling back the veil on the editing process. He has edited several nonfiction books, played with words as a corporate communicator, and reported for The Indianapolis Star.

Spring Cleaning? 10 Tips for Writers

I know it’s only February, but in my office that’s when I start thinking about Spring Cleaning. Why so early? Because I hate the process, even though it is vital to the smooth operation of my freelance editing business. If I don’t start early to think and plan for it, procrastination will win the day. So, maybe you’re like me? Here are 10 tips to clean out the cobwebs in your writing:

10. Keep it Simple You have many ongoing writing projects. Prioritize and be realistic.

9. Break it Down Do you need to brainstorm a new story? Have you left a protagonist dangling? Do you have a percolating editing project? Break your tasks into chunks. One week, brainstorm. The next week, rescue your protag. Then edit.

See the other eight tips at Novel Rocket!

Michael Ehret, for Writing on the Fine Line

Michael Ehret loves to play with words and as editor of the ACFW Journal, he is enjoying his playground. He also plays with words as a freelance editor here at WritingOnTheFineLine.com, where he often takes a writer Into The Edit, pulling back the veil on the editing process. He has edited several nonfiction books, played with words as a corporate communicator, and reported for The Indianapolis Star.